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In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

We’re proud to announce that In Situ Science is embarking on a new mission to bridge the gap between science research and science communication. We will be using our platform as a science communication outlet to support ongoing scientific research. In Situ Science is now a registered not-for-profit organisation. We are keen to work together with companies and individuals that are interested in supporting the … Continue reading In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

In Situ Science has partnered with the School of Environmental and Rural Sciences at the University of New England to recognise its excellent postgraduate research students. Three students at UNE have been awarded an In Situ Science Research Excellence Award to support their research. Each recipient will receive $1000 in research funding and will have a short film made about their research by In Situ … Continue reading In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

The genome of one of Australia’s most iconic animals, the koala, has been sequenced and has led to some surprising revelations about the creatures and their conservation. 54 scientists from 29 different countries worked together to finish sequencing and analyzing the entire koala genome. Led by researchers at the  Australian Museum Research Institute and the University of Sydney, the findings were recently published in Nature Genetics. … Continue reading Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

Life Vs Science is back!

After the success of last year’s event we’re back for 2018 to celebrate the Sydney Science Festival. Join us at the Camelot Lounge for a night of laughs, groans and insight as we record a live podcast with a panel of Sydney’s best and brightest scientists. BOOK TICKETS ONLINE Our panel will reveal all the wonderful and sometimes ridiculous ways that real life collides with … Continue reading Life Vs Science is back!

Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

New research has revealed that the mating behaviour of the St Andrew’s cross spider changes with age, with older males investing more time in courtship, possibly to avoid cannibalisation by more aggressive females. The St Andrew’s cross spider is a colourful orb weaving spider that is best recognised by its banded abdomen and the characteristic X-shaped cross on its web. These spiders typically live for … Continue reading Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Scientists have developed a new type of enzyme, called a NanoZyme, which is triggered by light to produce free radicals that kill bacteria. The technology could be used one day to fight infections by sterilising high-risk surfaces in areas such as hospitals and public bathrooms. Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne created these NanoZymes from tiny nanorods of cupric oxide. The rods themselves are 1,000 … Continue reading NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years

A rare species of clearwing moth, that appears to mimic a bee, has been rediscovered in the rainforests of Malaysia after being ‘lost’ for 130 years. Scientists have recorded footage of the metallic blue moths (Heterosphecia tawonoides) flying around the banks of rocky streams as described in an article published in Tropical Conservation Science. ‘When I first saw the clearwing in the Malaysian rainforest, I was … Continue reading Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years