Science Meets Making

Science is a creative process. Every time you ask a question or run an experiment you are doing something that has never been done before. Its no surprise then that science attracts very creative people. James O’Hanlon, the host of the In Situ Science podcast, is a zoologist that studies animal communication. To do this he uses his creative talents to make artificial animals that he … Continue reading Science Meets Making

Life Vs Science Highlights

The Sydney Science Festival 2017 rocked on from the 10th to the 20th of August. During this time, In Situ Science hosted “Life vs Science” a live podcast recording at The Camelot Lounge in Sydney. A wonderful audience filled the air with laughter as they learnt about science ‘behind-the-scenes’ from Jim Fishwick, Shane Hengst, Leigh Nicholson, James O’Hanlon and Alice Williamson. Check out the highlights … Continue reading Life Vs Science Highlights

What are animal weapons?

In this episode of In Situ Science we travel to New Zealand to spend some time with a research group from the University of Auckland that specialise in studying the behaviour and evolution of insects, spiders and harvestmen. This research group is currently working towards understanding the evolution of animal weapons. The lab’s leader Dr Greg Holwell introduces us to spiders and harvestmen with enormous … Continue reading What are animal weapons?

What is a Scientific Illustrator?

Observation, patience and attention to detail are skills necessary for both art and science. In Situ Science explores what it takes to be a scientific illustrator specialising in producing highly detailed and accurate images that demonstrate scientific concepts, specimens and procedures. Erin Walsh from the Australian National University is a research scientist and a scientific illustrator. Her skill and passion for illustration has helped shaped … Continue reading What is a Scientific Illustrator?

Lizard Societies – Julia Riley from Macquarie University

Why are animals social?  Researchers from Macquarie University in Sydney are delving into the private lives of skinks to understand why animals bond together. Reptiles are not usually considered the friendliest of animals, nor are they generally considered ‘social’ animals in the same way mammals and insects are. But recent research is showing us that we have underestimated our cold-blooded companions, and that lizards can form complex social … Continue reading Lizard Societies – Julia Riley from Macquarie University