Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Being a research scientist means surviving in a higly competitive professional environment. Transitioning out of this environment into other career pathways can be a challenging, rewarding and life changing experience. Siobhan Dennison started her career as a conservation genetecist, studying the ecology of skinks in inland Australia. She has now made the decision to move into science education and use her skills in science communcation … Continue reading Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Reconstructing the Earth’s history from fragments of information is an epic task requiring a variety of approaches. Paleontologists combine technological approaches, quantitative methods and artistic visualisations to reconstruct what dinosaur bodies would have looked like using fossil remains. Nicolás Campione is a quantitative paleontologist at the University of New England in Australia that undergoes this detective work to understand how animals have changed over time. … Continue reading Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

SPECIAL GUEST: CLARE STAWSKI (UNE) In the face of rapid environmental change scientists are racing to study how animals might be affected by change, or how they can adapt to deal with change. Recent discoveries have shown that changes in temperature are only one consideration and other aspects, such as changes in the frequency of bushfires can have a large impact on animal life histories. … Continue reading Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

How to launch a space agency

Australia’s announcement that it would launch its very own space agency was heralded with much jubilation from the scientific community. However, little has actually been said about how the nation will step forwards to create this national body. What information we do know was provided by the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science Arthur Sinodinos at the 68th International Astronautical Congress Industry Day Luncheon in … Continue reading How to launch a space agency

Ep 34. Natural history, sinister mates and the school of hard knocks with Greg Holwell

In a publish or perish environment scientists are finding it harder to spend time out in the field doing pure exploration. This is a great shame as we can never predict where the next great scientific discovery will come from. The wonders of the natural world around us are the ulitmate source of discovery, but for this to happen we need to find the time … Continue reading Ep 34. Natural history, sinister mates and the school of hard knocks with Greg Holwell

Ep 33. Frog calls, monsoons and haunted tennis courts with Jodi Rowley

Spending months on end trudging through monsoonal South East Asian Rainforests is a far cry from the suburban upbringing of Jodi Rowley. However travelling across the globe to remote locations in search of frogs is all part of the job as she now works as a herpetologist at the Australian Museum. She regularly spends time in South East Asia documenting the biodiversity of amphibians. This … Continue reading Ep 33. Frog calls, monsoons and haunted tennis courts with Jodi Rowley

Prehistoric plesiosaur filter-fed like a whale

New research shows that a prehistoric marine reptile fed by filtering small animals out of the water using their long ‘needle-like’ teeth. A team of scientists from South America and the USA re-examined the fossilised skull of the plesiosaur Morturneria seymourensis and uncovered the first known case of filter feeding in a marine reptile. This research has been published in the Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. … Continue reading Prehistoric plesiosaur filter-fed like a whale