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In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

We’re proud to announce that In Situ Science is embarking on a new mission to bridge the gap between science research and science communication. We will be using our platform as a science communication outlet to support ongoing scientific research. In Situ Science is now a registered not-for-profit organisation. We are keen to work together with companies and individuals that are interested in supporting the … Continue reading In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

In Situ Science has partnered with the School of Environmental and Rural Sciences at the University of New England to recognise its excellent postgraduate research students. Three students at UNE have been awarded an In Situ Science Research Excellence Award to support their research. Each recipient will receive $1000 in research funding and will have a short film made about their research by In Situ … Continue reading In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

The Desert Rat Kangaroo (Caloprymnus campestris), or ‘oolaculnta’ was last seen by scientist Hedley Herbert Finlayson in the 1930’s. Since then there have been a number of accounts which suggest that this rare and elusive creature may still be out there, in the stony deserts of South Australia. In Australia, which has one of the worst records for mammal extinctions due to human activity, finding … Continue reading Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

Ep 54. Dinosaur detectives and frozen crocodiles with Ada Klinkhamer

The enormous, long-necked Sauropods are some of the most iconic dinosaurs, and its no surprise given the almost unfathomable sizes that they grew to. Ada Klinkhamer is a palaeontologist from the University of New England that studies how these ancient beasts could have moved and how their skeletons would have supported such enormous bodies. In an interview with In Situ Science Ada chats with us … Continue reading Ep 54. Dinosaur detectives and frozen crocodiles with Ada Klinkhamer

Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

The genome of one of Australia’s most iconic animals, the koala, has been sequenced and has led to some surprising revelations about the creatures and their conservation. 54 scientists from 29 different countries worked together to finish sequencing and analyzing the entire koala genome. Led by researchers at the  Australian Museum Research Institute and the University of Sydney, the findings were recently published in Nature Genetics. … Continue reading Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Australian landscapes have been changed drastically by agricultural practices brought here by European settlers. Some of these have had dramatic impacts on the health of ecosystems and the productivity of farms in Australian climates. One way of addressing these issues is to draw upon the expertise of Australia’s Aboriginal people who have lived here for tens of thousands of years. In practice, however, this is … Continue reading Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Ep 52. Truffle travel and primitive skills with Todd Elliott

Fungi are the unsung heroes of our natural world. Their incredible life histories make it possible for plants to grow animals to survive and are often incredibly important cultural resources. Mycologist and natural historian Todd Elliot is currently doing his PhD at the University of New England and is studying the dispersal of truffles throughout Eastern Australia. In an interview with In Situ Science Todd … Continue reading Ep 52. Truffle travel and primitive skills with Todd Elliott