Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

‘There are many Maries out there… But there’s only one Mariella, and thats me.’ – Mariella Herberstein In addition to her research, Mariella Herberstein is well known for her role as a mentor to emerging scientists in biological sciences. In an interview with In Situ Science she discusses how important a collegiate and positive research environment is to making good science happen. She also tells … Continue reading Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

Ep 42. Curious minds, homeward bound and just wingin’ it with Mary McMillan

SPECIAL GUEST: Mary McMillan (UNE) In hindsight, career pathways seem like they were meticulously planned and pre-destined. The reality is that they are an unpredictable rollercoaster ride grasping at whatever opportunities present themselves along the way. In an interview with In Situ Science Mary McMillan takes us through the twists and turns that lead to her career as a molecular biologist at the University of … Continue reading Ep 42. Curious minds, homeward bound and just wingin’ it with Mary McMillan

Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

SPECIAL GUEST: CHARLOTTE MILLS (UNSW) The loss of mammals in Australia is having huge impacts on natural ecosystems. So big in fact that they are visible from space. Charlotte Mills is a PhD candidate from the University of New South Wales studying the role mammals play in the functioning of desert ecosystems. In an interview with In Situ Science she describes how disrupting the important … Continue reading Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Stop murdering invertebrates. OK? Good. Dr Kate Umbers is an animal behaviour expert from Western Sydney University who is fighting to make sure that invertebrates are recognised as the wonderful creatures they are. In an interview with In Situ Science she says that perhaps the arts are the best way of teaching people about the majesty of the other 99% of the animal kingdom. By … Continue reading Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Being a research scientist means surviving in a higly competitive professional environment. Transitioning out of this environment into other career pathways can be a challenging, rewarding and life changing experience. Siobhan Dennison started her career as a conservation genetecist, studying the ecology of skinks in inland Australia. She has now made the decision to move into science education and use her skills in science communcation … Continue reading Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Reconstructing the Earth’s history from fragments of information is an epic task requiring a variety of approaches. Paleontologists combine technological approaches, quantitative methods and artistic visualisations to reconstruct what dinosaur bodies would have looked like using fossil remains. Nicolás Campione is a quantitative paleontologist at the University of New England in Australia that undergoes this detective work to understand how animals have changed over time. … Continue reading Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

SPECIAL GUEST: CLARE STAWSKI (UNE) In the face of rapid environmental change scientists are racing to study how animals might be affected by change, or how they can adapt to deal with change. Recent discoveries have shown that changes in temperature are only one consideration and other aspects, such as changes in the frequency of bushfires can have a large impact on animal life histories. … Continue reading Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski