Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki is perhaps Australia’s most prolific and well known science communicator. He has written over 43 books, and has appeared regularly on national radio for over 30 years. In an interview with In Situ Science we chat about the immense amount of research and hard work that goes in to building up Dr Karl’s broad  range of expertise. We then delve into his … Continue reading Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

“Born too late to explore the earth. Born too early to explore the stars” – Anonymous Modern scientists often have the strange feeling that they have been born in the wrong era; that they are the ‘middle children’ of history. They read enviously about the exploits of explorers past, sailing boldly into uncharted waters, and worry that they may never be able to undertake those … Continue reading Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Twice a year Australians get together to scour their backyards for native pollinators. The Wild Pollinator count is a nation-wide citizen science project aimed at increasing awareness of Australia’s native pollinator diversity. It was started a few years back by a team including ecologist Manu Saunders. In an interview with In Situ Science Manu describes how it is important that people understand that bees are … Continue reading Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald

Australia’s iconic birdlife can be a divisive issue. Whilst some species are welcomed into backyards and gardens, others are derided as pests and invaders. Paul McDonald studies the behaviour of one particularly divisive species, the Noisy Miner. Whilst many people may regard them as urban pests, Paul says that beneath their screeching facade they exhibit complex social behaviour, comparable even to primates. Paul McDonald is … Continue reading Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald

Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

SPECIAL GUEST: CHARLOTTE MILLS (UNSW) The loss of mammals in Australia is having huge impacts on natural ecosystems. So big in fact that they are visible from space. Charlotte Mills is a PhD candidate from the University of New South Wales studying the role mammals play in the functioning of desert ecosystems. In an interview with In Situ Science she describes how disrupting the important … Continue reading Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Being a research scientist means surviving in a higly competitive professional environment. Transitioning out of this environment into other career pathways can be a challenging, rewarding and life changing experience. Siobhan Dennison started her career as a conservation genetecist, studying the ecology of skinks in inland Australia. She has now made the decision to move into science education and use her skills in science communcation … Continue reading Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

SPECIAL GUEST: CLARE STAWSKI (UNE) In the face of rapid environmental change scientists are racing to study how animals might be affected by change, or how they can adapt to deal with change. Recent discoveries have shown that changes in temperature are only one consideration and other aspects, such as changes in the frequency of bushfires can have a large impact on animal life histories. … Continue reading Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski