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In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

We’re proud to announce that In Situ Science is embarking on a new mission to bridge the gap between science research and science communication. We will be using our platform as a science communication outlet to support ongoing scientific research. In Situ Science is now a registered not-for-profit organisation. We are keen to work together with companies and individuals that are interested in supporting the … Continue reading In Situ Science – Making Science Happen

In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

In Situ Science has partnered with the School of Environmental and Rural Sciences at the University of New England to recognise its excellent postgraduate research students. Three students at UNE have been awarded an In Situ Science Research Excellence Award to support their research. Each recipient will receive $1000 in research funding and will have a short film made about their research by In Situ … Continue reading In Situ Science Research Excellence Awards

Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

The Desert Rat Kangaroo (Caloprymnus campestris), or ‘oolaculnta’ was last seen by scientist Hedley Herbert Finlayson in the 1930’s. Since then there have been a number of accounts which suggest that this rare and elusive creature may still be out there, in the stony deserts of South Australia. In Australia, which has one of the worst records for mammal extinctions due to human activity, finding … Continue reading Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Australian landscapes have been changed drastically by agricultural practices brought here by European settlers. Some of these have had dramatic impacts on the health of ecosystems and the productivity of farms in Australian climates. One way of addressing these issues is to draw upon the expertise of Australia’s Aboriginal people who have lived here for tens of thousands of years. In practice, however, this is … Continue reading Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

New research has revealed that the mating behaviour of the St Andrew’s cross spider changes with age, with older males investing more time in courtship, possibly to avoid cannibalisation by more aggressive females. The St Andrew’s cross spider is a colourful orb weaving spider that is best recognised by its banded abdomen and the characteristic X-shaped cross on its web. These spiders typically live for … Continue reading Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

In the summer of 2008 Stuart Harris was out bushwalking when he spotted a small colourful spider. He decided to take a photo and put it up online on his flickr account. Little did he know that this was a peacock spider that was previously unknown to science. This marked the beginning of a long adventure for Stuart, along with a number of passionate arachnologists … Continue reading Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Scientists have developed a new type of enzyme, called a NanoZyme, which is triggered by light to produce free radicals that kill bacteria. The technology could be used one day to fight infections by sterilising high-risk surfaces in areas such as hospitals and public bathrooms. Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne created these NanoZymes from tiny nanorods of cupric oxide. The rods themselves are 1,000 … Continue reading NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria