Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

New research has revealed that the mating behaviour of the St Andrew’s cross spider changes with age, with older males investing more time in courtship, possibly to avoid cannibalisation by more aggressive females. The St Andrew’s cross spider is a colourful orb weaving spider that is best recognised by its banded abdomen and the characteristic X-shaped cross on its web. These spiders typically live for … Continue reading Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

In the summer of 2008 Stuart Harris was out bushwalking when he spotted a small colourful spider. He decided to take a photo and put it up online on his flickr account. Little did he know that this was a peacock spider that was previously unknown to science. This marked the beginning of a long adventure for Stuart, along with a number of passionate arachnologists … Continue reading Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Scientists have developed a new type of enzyme, called a NanoZyme, which is triggered by light to produce free radicals that kill bacteria. The technology could be used one day to fight infections by sterilising high-risk surfaces in areas such as hospitals and public bathrooms. Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne created these NanoZymes from tiny nanorods of cupric oxide. The rods themselves are 1,000 … Continue reading NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki is perhaps Australia’s most prolific and well known science communicator. He has written over 43 books, and has appeared regularly on national radio for over 30 years. In an interview with In Situ Science we chat about the immense amount of research and hard work that goes in to building up Dr Karl’s broad  range of expertise. We then delve into his … Continue reading Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

‘There are many Maries out there… But there’s only one Mariella, and thats me.’ – Mariella Herberstein In addition to her research, Mariella Herberstein is well known for her role as a mentor to emerging scientists in biological sciences. In an interview with In Situ Science she discusses how important a collegiate and positive research environment is to making good science happen. She also tells … Continue reading Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

“Born too late to explore the earth. Born too early to explore the stars” – Anonymous Modern scientists often have the strange feeling that they have been born in the wrong era; that they are the ‘middle children’ of history. They read enviously about the exploits of explorers past, sailing boldly into uncharted waters, and worry that they may never be able to undertake those … Continue reading Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Stop murdering invertebrates. OK? Good. Dr Kate Umbers is an animal behaviour expert from Western Sydney University who is fighting to make sure that invertebrates are recognised as the wonderful creatures they are. In an interview with In Situ Science she says that perhaps the arts are the best way of teaching people about the majesty of the other 99% of the animal kingdom. By … Continue reading Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers