Ep 52. Truffle travel and primitive skills with Todd Elliott

Fungi are the unsung heroes of our natural world. Their incredible life histories make it possible for plants to grow animals to survive and are often incredibly important cultural resources. Mycologist and natural historian Todd Elliot is currently doing his PhD at the University of New England and is studying the dispersal of truffles throughout Eastern Australia. In an interview with In Situ Science Todd … Continue reading Ep 52. Truffle travel and primitive skills with Todd Elliott

Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

The tables have turned this episode as the interviewer becomes the interviewee. Siobhan Dennison puts In Situ Science host James O’Hanlon under the microscope to find out more about what he does and why he does it. James O’Hanlon is a behavioural ecologist from the University of New England that has a passion for studying poorly understood creatures and exploring the unknown. In this interview … Continue reading Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

In the summer of 2008 Stuart Harris was out bushwalking when he spotted a small colourful spider. He decided to take a photo and put it up online on his flickr account. Little did he know that this was a peacock spider that was previously unknown to science. This marked the beginning of a long adventure for Stuart, along with a number of passionate arachnologists … Continue reading Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

To raise awareness for shorebird conservation, zoologist and illustrator Milly Formby has formed an epic plan; she will circumnavigate Australia in a microlight aircraft. This journey is roughly the same length as one of the worlds most important seabird migration routes, the East Asian-Australian Flyway. Milly is a multi-talented scientist, artist, and explorer. After beginner her career in visual arts as a tapestry weaver, she … Continue reading Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

“Born too late to explore the earth. Born too early to explore the stars” – Anonymous Modern scientists often have the strange feeling that they have been born in the wrong era; that they are the ‘middle children’ of history. They read enviously about the exploits of explorers past, sailing boldly into uncharted waters, and worry that they may never be able to undertake those … Continue reading Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Stop murdering invertebrates. OK? Good. Dr Kate Umbers is an animal behaviour expert from Western Sydney University who is fighting to make sure that invertebrates are recognised as the wonderful creatures they are. In an interview with In Situ Science she says that perhaps the arts are the best way of teaching people about the majesty of the other 99% of the animal kingdom. By … Continue reading Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years

A rare species of clearwing moth, that appears to mimic a bee, has been rediscovered in the rainforests of Malaysia after being ‘lost’ for 130 years. Scientists have recorded footage of the metallic blue moths (Heterosphecia tawonoides) flying around the banks of rocky streams as described in an article published in Tropical Conservation Science. ‘When I first saw the clearwing in the Malaysian rainforest, I was … Continue reading Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years