Ep 81. Harry potter, taxonomy and academic publishing with Tom Saunders

Tom Saunders experienced a burst of scientific fame after naming a newfound species of wasp Lusius malfoyi, after the beloved and maligned Harry Potter character Lucius Malfoy. Naming new species after pop culture figures has become a useful tool for enhancing public awareness taxonomy and biodiversity research. Taking this strategy though has to be handled delicately as paying homage to beloved fictional characters can upset … Continue reading Ep 81. Harry potter, taxonomy and academic publishing with Tom Saunders

Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Amy Martin is a researcher at the University of Auckland that studies the incredible private lives of orchids that trick male wasps into mating with them. By depriving these wasp populations of male sperm they can actually have long term effects on the wasp populations. Amy says that this is why deceptive orchids the world over tend to use haplodiploid insects as their pollinators as … Continue reading Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Ep 74. Cotton, moths, and kleptoparasites with Mary Whitehouse

Farmers have learned that the widespread use of pesticides is a dangerous strategy as it can lead to the evolution of highly pesticide resistant crop pests. Land managers are moving towards ‘Integrated Pest Management’ techniques that use a multitude of strategies to more responsibly control pests, including fostering populations of natural pest predators.  https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/nzfrzc/Mary_Whitehouse.mp3 Mary Whitehouse has (in her own words) been masquerading as an … Continue reading Ep 74. Cotton, moths, and kleptoparasites with Mary Whitehouse

Ep 72. Honey bees, slime moulds and velvet worms with Tanya Latty

  Urban beekeeping is all the rage but its not the only thing you can do to help pollinators. Tanya Latty from the University of Sydney says being a lazy gardener may be the best thing you can do to help your local bees, beetles and butterflies. Tanya’s work was recently featured on ABC’s Catalyst as part of the Great Australian Bee Challenge. Tanya and her … Continue reading Ep 72. Honey bees, slime moulds and velvet worms with Tanya Latty

Life Vs Science 2018: Video Highlights

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a scientist? Do they really wear lab coats? Are they really all timid nerds, like in the movies? All these questions and more were answered at In Situ Science’s annual Life Vs Science live podcast recording. Each year we celebrate National Science Week and the Sydney Science Festival with a live podcast at the Camelot Lounge … Continue reading Life Vs Science 2018: Video Highlights

Science Meets Making

Science is a creative process. Every time you ask a question or run an experiment you are doing something that has never been done before. Its no surprise then that science attracts very creative people. James O’Hanlon, the host of the In Situ Science podcast, is a zoologist that studies animal communication. To do this he uses his creative talents to make artificial animals that he … Continue reading Science Meets Making

Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Stop murdering invertebrates. OK? Good. Dr Kate Umbers is an animal behaviour expert from Western Sydney University who is fighting to make sure that invertebrates are recognised as the wonderful creatures they are. In an interview with In Situ Science she says that perhaps the arts are the best way of teaching people about the majesty of the other 99% of the animal kingdom. By … Continue reading Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers