Ep 59. Stem cells, scicom and fatty tubes with Naomi Koh Belic

The potential for using stem cells in medical treatments is really only just being explored. Despite this there are already unsubstantiated claims being shared and predatory cosmetic stem cell treatments on the market. Naomi Koh Belic is a PhD researcher at the University of Technology, Sydney who studies the biology of human stem cells and how they differentiate into other cell types. In an interview … Continue reading Ep 59. Stem cells, scicom and fatty tubes with Naomi Koh Belic

Ep 57. Medical foot-soldiers and shiny bugs with Scott Fabricant

Boffins, tinkerers, deep-thinkers, these are terms people often use to describe the stereotypical scientist, sitting away in the lab slowly piecing together facts and data. And for a lot of scientists this is true, but not all scientists are the same, and for some this long-game of piecing together complex puzzles simply isn’t satisfying. So what type of science do these people do? Scott Fabricant … Continue reading Ep 57. Medical foot-soldiers and shiny bugs with Scott Fabricant

Life Vs Science 2018: Video Highlights

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a scientist? Do they really wear lab coats? Are they really all timid nerds, like in the movies? All these questions and more were answered at In Situ Science’s annual Life Vs Science live podcast recording. Each year we celebrate National Science Week and the Sydney Science Festival with a live podcast at the Camelot Lounge … Continue reading Life Vs Science 2018: Video Highlights

Ep 56. Life Vs Science 2018

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a scientist? Do they really wear lab coats? Are they really all timid nerds, like in the movies? All these questions and more were answered at In Situ Science’s annual Life Vs Science live podcast recording. Each year we celebrate National Science Week and the Sydney Science Festival with a live podcast at the Camelot Lounge … Continue reading Ep 56. Life Vs Science 2018

NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Scientists have developed a new type of enzyme, called a NanoZyme, which is triggered by light to produce free radicals that kill bacteria. The technology could be used one day to fight infections by sterilising high-risk surfaces in areas such as hospitals and public bathrooms. Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne created these NanoZymes from tiny nanorods of cupric oxide. The rods themselves are 1,000 … Continue reading NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Ep 43. Microbial Game of Thrones with Gal Winter

How is your gut health affecting your brain? Recent research suggests that conditions like depression can actually be linked to the microbiology of your gut. Dr Gal Winter from the University of New England is a microbiologist that studies the microbial communities involved in food digestion and how it can affect your health. In an interview with In Situ Science Gal explains how your gut … Continue reading Ep 43. Microbial Game of Thrones with Gal Winter

Ep 42. Curious minds, homeward bound and just wingin’ it with Mary McMillan

SPECIAL GUEST: Mary McMillan (UNE) In hindsight, career pathways seem like they were meticulously planned and pre-destined. The reality is that they are an unpredictable rollercoaster ride grasping at whatever opportunities present themselves along the way. In an interview with In Situ Science Mary McMillan takes us through the twists and turns that lead to her career as a molecular biologist at the University of … Continue reading Ep 42. Curious minds, homeward bound and just wingin’ it with Mary McMillan