How much water does it take to grow a duck?

Wetlands, despite their name, aren’t always wet. But when the rain starts and the rivers flow theses dynamic landscapes can flourish with life. Though the question remains, how much water is enough? Freshwater ecosystems have been significantly altered by water management for human use. In particular, flow regulation has resulted in enormous declines in both the extent and health of wetlands. In 2018 Lindsey Frost … Continue reading How much water does it take to grow a duck?

The Science Behind Poultry Farming

The global demand for poultry continues to rise but the resources we have to produce them don’t, so how can we continue to farm poultry sustainably, ethically and responsibly? A large proportion (20%) of dietary protein fed to broiler chickens is undigestible. These represent a significant proportion of diet cost and may have negative effects on broiler gastrointestinal health and performance. Moreover, decreasing protein excretion … Continue reading The Science Behind Poultry Farming

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Become an In Situ Science Patron

In Situ Science is on a mission to support groundbreaking scientific research and exploration, and share this science with as many people as possible. In 2018 alone In Situ Science gave financial support to three different research projects, contributed to the SCINEMA international science film festival and the Sydney Science Festival, produced 26 freely available podcasts and supported a range of free science events throughout … Continue reading Become an In Situ Science Patron

Ep 75. Small shelly fossils and paleo tattoos with Marissa Betts

Palaeontology isn’t just about Dinosaurs! Marissa Betts is a researcher at the University of New England that studies the evolution of miniscule animals that existed during the Cambrian explosion. During this era animals evolved hard shelled bodies that made them much more likely to fossilise. By looking at these tiny fossils Marissa can investigate how lifeforms on earth have changed over millions of years and … Continue reading Ep 75. Small shelly fossils and paleo tattoos with Marissa Betts

Ep 74. Cotton, moths, and kleptoparasites with Mary Whitehouse

Farmers have learned that the widespread use of pesticides is a dangerous strategy as it can lead to the evolution of highly pesticide resistant crop pests. Land managers are moving towards ‘Integrated Pest Management’ techniques that use a multitude of strategies to more responsibly control pests, including fostering populations of natural pest predators.  https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/nzfrzc/Mary_Whitehouse.mp3 Mary Whitehouse has (in her own words) been masquerading as an … Continue reading Ep 74. Cotton, moths, and kleptoparasites with Mary Whitehouse

Science Meets Design 2019 Video Highlights

Can science explain what makes good design? Are designers and scientists really that different? Or are they both just explorers searching for truth in different ways? We celebrated the intersections of Science and Design at the Sydney Design Panel with a celebrity panel featuring Tom Gordon, Chris Reid, Wendy Davis and Laura Jade Hindes. We explored everything from optical illusions to corpse piles to redneck … Continue reading Science Meets Design 2019 Video Highlights

Ep 72. Honey bees, slime moulds and velvet worms with Tanya Latty

  Urban beekeeping is all the rage but its not the only thing you can do to help pollinators. Tanya Latty from the University of Sydney says being a lazy gardener may be the best thing you can do to help your local bees, beetles and butterflies. Tanya’s work was recently featured on ABC’s Catalyst as part of the Great Australian Bee Challenge. Tanya and her … Continue reading Ep 72. Honey bees, slime moulds and velvet worms with Tanya Latty