Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Reconstructing the Earth’s history from fragments of information is an epic task requiring a variety of approaches. Paleontologists combine technological approaches, quantitative methods and artistic visualisations to reconstruct what dinosaur bodies would have looked like using fossil remains. Nicolás Campione is a quantitative paleontologist at the University of New England in Australia that undergoes this detective work to understand how animals have changed over time. … Continue reading Ep 36. Lumping dinosaurs and paleo name-dropping with Nic Campione

Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

SPECIAL GUEST: CLARE STAWSKI (UNE) In the face of rapid environmental change scientists are racing to study how animals might be affected by change, or how they can adapt to deal with change. Recent discoveries have shown that changes in temperature are only one consideration and other aspects, such as changes in the frequency of bushfires can have a large impact on animal life histories. … Continue reading Ep 35. Microbats, bushfires and learning Norwegian with Clare Stawski

Prehistoric plesiosaur filter-fed like a whale

New research shows that a prehistoric marine reptile fed by filtering small animals out of the water using their long ‘needle-like’ teeth. A team of scientists from South America and the USA re-examined the fossilised skull of the plesiosaur Morturneria seymourensis and uncovered the first known case of filter feeding in a marine reptile. This research has been published in the Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology. … Continue reading Prehistoric plesiosaur filter-fed like a whale

Democracy: It’s for the dogs

An international team of researchers has uncovered that African wild dogs behave in an unusual way: voting by sneezing to determine when the pack is ready to move out for the hunt. While it is common for certain animals to reach a consensus before partaking in a particular activity, the fact that the dogs used sneezing to vote and that not all votes are equal … Continue reading Democracy: It’s for the dogs

Ep 31. Giant spiders, motherhood and lazy journalism with Lizzy Lowe

SPECIAL GUEST: LIZZY LOWE (MQ) For some they are feared creatures, for others they are friendly backyard acquaintances. Spiders, for some reason, are divisive creatures that have been unfairly burdened with a terrible reputation for being deadly assassins. Arachnologist Dr Lizzy Lowe spends most of her time researching the ecology and behaviour of spiders, and when she isn’t doing that she is working hard to … Continue reading Ep 31. Giant spiders, motherhood and lazy journalism with Lizzy Lowe

Ep 30. Monster girls, parasitism and social media with Tommy Leung

SPECIAL GUEST: DR TOMMY LEUNG (UNE) James chats with king of outreach and parasite ‘otaku’ Dr Tommy Leung. Tommy is a prolific researcher, communicator, artist and philosopher. When he is not researching the ecology and evolution of parasites he is exploring creative dimensions with Illustration and engaging with scientists and artists through his online persona. We discuss how scientists are much more creative than they … Continue reading Ep 30. Monster girls, parasitism and social media with Tommy Leung