Ep 61. Wetlands, waterbirds and food webs with Lindsey Frost

Wetlands aren’t always wet. Sounds strange but in an arid country like Australia, wetlands may be dry for decades at a time  until water arrives via rain and flooding events. These unique habitats provide crucial resources for diverse ecosystems that thrive under dynamic boom-and-bust situations. https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/jrech2/LindseyFrost.mp3 Lindsey Frost is a wetland ecologist from the University of New England who is setting out to answer the … Continue reading Ep 61. Wetlands, waterbirds and food webs with Lindsey Frost

Ep 60. Green cities, mole crickets, and impostor syndrome with Dieter Hochuli

“A society grows great when men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.”  – Greek proverb Dieter Hochuli is an invertebrate biologist and urban ecologist from the University of Sydney that studies how nature survives in towns and cities. His research investigates the ecological, economical and psychological benefits of nature in cities, and how our modern way of life affects the … Continue reading Ep 60. Green cities, mole crickets, and impostor syndrome with Dieter Hochuli

Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

The Desert Rat Kangaroo (Caloprymnus campestris), or ‘oolaculnta’ was last seen by scientist Hedley Herbert Finlayson in the 1930’s. Since then there have been a number of accounts which suggest that this rare and elusive creature may still be out there, in the stony deserts of South Australia. In Australia, which has one of the worst records for mammal extinctions due to human activity, finding … Continue reading Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Amphibian populations across the globe have been declining rapidly, and the most dangerous contributor to this is the chytrid fungus; a skin disease that affects frogs and salamanders. Dr Deborah Bower from the University of New England says that if we want to have any chance of saving these species then we need to conserve as much of their native habitat as possible. In an … Continue reading Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

To raise awareness for shorebird conservation, zoologist and illustrator Milly Formby has formed an epic plan; she will circumnavigate Australia in a microlight aircraft. This journey is roughly the same length as one of the worlds most important seabird migration routes, the East Asian-Australian Flyway. Milly is a multi-talented scientist, artist, and explorer. After beginner her career in visual arts as a tapestry weaver, she … Continue reading Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Twice a year Australians get together to scour their backyards for native pollinators. The Wild Pollinator count is a nation-wide citizen science project aimed at increasing awareness of Australia’s native pollinator diversity. It was started a few years back by a team including ecologist Manu Saunders. In an interview with In Situ Science Manu describes how it is important that people understand that bees are … Continue reading Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald

Australia’s iconic birdlife can be a divisive issue. Whilst some species are welcomed into backyards and gardens, others are derided as pests and invaders. Paul McDonald studies the behaviour of one particularly divisive species, the Noisy Miner. Whilst many people may regard them as urban pests, Paul says that beneath their screeching facade they exhibit complex social behaviour, comparable even to primates. Paul McDonald is … Continue reading Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald