Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

To raise awareness for shorebird conservation, zoologist and illustrator Milly Formby has formed an epic plan; she will circumnavigate Australia in a microlight aircraft. This journey is roughly the same length as one of the worlds most important seabird migration routes, the East Asian-Australian Flyway. Milly is a multi-talented scientist, artist, and explorer. After beginner her career in visual arts as a tapestry weaver, she … Continue reading Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Twice a year Australians get together to scour their backyards for native pollinators. The Wild Pollinator count is a nation-wide citizen science project aimed at increasing awareness of Australia’s native pollinator diversity. It was started a few years back by a team including ecologist Manu Saunders. In an interview with In Situ Science Manu describes how it is important that people understand that bees are … Continue reading Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald

Australia’s iconic birdlife can be a divisive issue. Whilst some species are welcomed into backyards and gardens, others are derided as pests and invaders. Paul McDonald studies the behaviour of one particularly divisive species, the Noisy Miner. Whilst many people may regard them as urban pests, Paul says that beneath their screeching facade they exhibit complex social behaviour, comparable even to primates. Paul McDonald is … Continue reading Ep 40. Twitchers, miners and presidential decorum with Paul McDonald

Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

SPECIAL GUEST: CHARLOTTE MILLS (UNSW) The loss of mammals in Australia is having huge impacts on natural ecosystems. So big in fact that they are visible from space. Charlotte Mills is a PhD candidate from the University of New South Wales studying the role mammals play in the functioning of desert ecosystems. In an interview with In Situ Science she describes how disrupting the important … Continue reading Ep 39. Dingo fences, desert spice and writings in the sand with Charlotte Mills

Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Stop murdering invertebrates. OK? Good. Dr Kate Umbers is an animal behaviour expert from Western Sydney University who is fighting to make sure that invertebrates are recognised as the wonderful creatures they are. In an interview with In Situ Science she says that perhaps the arts are the best way of teaching people about the majesty of the other 99% of the animal kingdom. By … Continue reading Ep 38. Mr Do Bee, Katydids and Superstars of STEM with Kate Umbers

Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years

A rare species of clearwing moth, that appears to mimic a bee, has been rediscovered in the rainforests of Malaysia after being ‘lost’ for 130 years. Scientists have recorded footage of the metallic blue moths (Heterosphecia tawonoides) flying around the banks of rocky streams as described in an article published in Tropical Conservation Science. ‘When I first saw the clearwing in the Malaysian rainforest, I was … Continue reading Bee-mimicking moth rediscovered after 130 years

Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison

Being a research scientist means surviving in a higly competitive professional environment. Transitioning out of this environment into other career pathways can be a challenging, rewarding and life changing experience. Siobhan Dennison started her career as a conservation genetecist, studying the ecology of skinks in inland Australia. She has now made the decision to move into science education and use her skills in science communcation … Continue reading Ep 37. Career changes, science buses and Buster the Skink with Siobhan Dennison