Ep 60. Green cities, mole crickets, and impostor syndrome with Dieter Hochuli

“A society grows great when men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.”  – Greek proverb Dieter Hochuli is an invertebrate biologist and urban ecologist from the University of Sydney that studies how nature survives in towns and cities. His research investigates the ecological, economical and psychological benefits of nature in cities, and how our modern way of life affects the … Continue reading Ep 60. Green cities, mole crickets, and impostor syndrome with Dieter Hochuli

Ep 59. Stem cells, scicom and fatty tubes with Naomi Koh Belic

The potential for using stem cells in medical treatments is really only just being explored. Despite this there are already unsubstantiated claims being shared and predatory cosmetic stem cell treatments on the market. Naomi Koh Belic is a PhD researcher at the University of Technology, Sydney who studies the biology of human stem cells and how they differentiate into other cell types. In an interview … Continue reading Ep 59. Stem cells, scicom and fatty tubes with Naomi Koh Belic

Ep 58. Droughts, drones and data with David Lamb

Living and working in a regional town is having your cake and eating it too! David Lamb is a distinguished professor at the University of New England and Chief Scientist of the Food Agility CRC. He has spent his professional career at regional universities throughout Australia and wouldn’t have it any other way. The research he does on food production in agriculture can contribute straight … Continue reading Ep 58. Droughts, drones and data with David Lamb

Ep 57. Medical foot-soldiers and shiny bugs with Scott Fabricant

Boffins, tinkerers, deep-thinkers, these are terms people often use to describe the stereotypical scientist, sitting away in the lab slowly piecing together facts and data. And for a lot of scientists this is true, but not all scientists are the same, and for some this long-game of piecing together complex puzzles simply isn’t satisfying. So what type of science do these people do? Scott Fabricant … Continue reading Ep 57. Medical foot-soldiers and shiny bugs with Scott Fabricant

Ep 56. Life Vs Science 2018

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a scientist? Do they really wear lab coats? Are they really all timid nerds, like in the movies? All these questions and more were answered at In Situ Science’s annual Life Vs Science live podcast recording. Each year we celebrate National Science Week and the Sydney Science Festival with a live podcast at the Camelot Lounge … Continue reading Ep 56. Life Vs Science 2018

Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

The Desert Rat Kangaroo (Caloprymnus campestris), or ‘oolaculnta’ was last seen by scientist Hedley Herbert Finlayson in the 1930’s. Since then there have been a number of accounts which suggest that this rare and elusive creature may still be out there, in the stony deserts of South Australia. In Australia, which has one of the worst records for mammal extinctions due to human activity, finding … Continue reading Ep 55. Searching for the ‘lost’ Desert Rat Kangaroo with Karl Vernes

Ep 54. Dinosaur detectives and frozen crocodiles with Ada Klinkhamer

The enormous, long-necked Sauropods are some of the most iconic dinosaurs, and its no surprise given the almost unfathomable sizes that they grew to. Ada Klinkhamer is a palaeontologist from the University of New England that studies how these ancient beasts could have moved and how their skeletons would have supported such enormous bodies. In an interview with In Situ Science Ada chats with us … Continue reading Ep 54. Dinosaur detectives and frozen crocodiles with Ada Klinkhamer