Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

The genome of one of Australia’s most iconic animals, the koala, has been sequenced and has led to some surprising revelations about the creatures and their conservation. 54 scientists from 29 different countries worked together to finish sequencing and analyzing the entire koala genome. Led by researchers at the  Australian Museum Research Institute and the University of Sydney, the findings were recently published in Nature Genetics. … Continue reading Koalas’ Secrets Hidden in their Genes

Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Australian landscapes have been changed drastically by agricultural practices brought here by European settlers. Some of these have had dramatic impacts on the health of ecosystems and the productivity of farms in Australian climates. One way of addressing these issues is to draw upon the expertise of Australia’s Aboriginal people who have lived here for tens of thousands of years. In practice, however, this is … Continue reading Ep 53. Indigenous knowledge meets Farmer Brown with Harry White

Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Amphibian populations across the globe have been declining rapidly, and the most dangerous contributor to this is the chytrid fungus; a skin disease that affects frogs and salamanders. Dr Deborah Bower from the University of New England says that if we want to have any chance of saving these species then we need to conserve as much of their native habitat as possible. In an … Continue reading Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

The tables have turned this episode as the interviewer becomes the interviewee. Siobhan Dennison puts In Situ Science host James O’Hanlon under the microscope to find out more about what he does and why he does it. James O’Hanlon is a behavioural ecologist from the University of New England that has a passion for studying poorly understood creatures and exploring the unknown. In this interview … Continue reading Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

New research has revealed that the mating behaviour of the St Andrew’s cross spider changes with age, with older males investing more time in courtship, possibly to avoid cannibalisation by more aggressive females. The St Andrew’s cross spider is a colourful orb weaving spider that is best recognised by its banded abdomen and the characteristic X-shaped cross on its web. These spiders typically live for … Continue reading Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

In the summer of 2008 Stuart Harris was out bushwalking when he spotted a small colourful spider. He decided to take a photo and put it up online on his flickr account. Little did he know that this was a peacock spider that was previously unknown to science. This marked the beginning of a long adventure for Stuart, along with a number of passionate arachnologists … Continue reading Ep 49. Peacock spiders and citizen science with Stuart Harris

Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

‘There are many Maries out there… But there’s only one Mariella, and thats me.’ – Mariella Herberstein In addition to her research, Mariella Herberstein is well known for her role as a mentor to emerging scientists in biological sciences. In an interview with In Situ Science she discusses how important a collegiate and positive research environment is to making good science happen. She also tells … Continue reading Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein