Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Amy Martin is a researcher at the University of Auckland that studies the incredible private lives of orchids that trick male wasps into mating with them. By depriving these wasp populations of male sperm they can actually have long term effects on the wasp populations. Amy says that this is why deceptive orchids the world over tend to use haplodiploid insects as their pollinators as … Continue reading Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Life Vs Science: In Situ Science Live

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a scientist? Do they really wear lab coats? Are they really all timid nerds, like in the movies? All these questions and more will be answered In Situ Science’s annual ‘Life Vs Science’ live podcast recording. Where: Django Bar, Camelot Lounge Marrickville When: Thursday 15th of August – Doors open 6pm BOOK TICKETS ONLINE Join us … Continue reading Life Vs Science: In Situ Science Live

Ep 78. Lizard fights and crafternoons with Fonti Kar

Fonti Kar is a behavioural ecologist from the University of New South Wales. She studies the life history of skinks and how the conditions they are born in can affect their behaviour and development later on in life. In this interview Fonti we dive deep into what it takes to be a productive scientist and the pros and cons of forging out a career in … Continue reading Ep 78. Lizard fights and crafternoons with Fonti Kar

Ep 77. Craft beers, trilobites and Lagerstätten with John Paterson

John Paterson is a professor of paleontology and earth sciences at the University of New England. He studies the evolution of life during the Cambrian explosion. Some of his recent research has shown that during this time some of the largest predators around, Anomalocaris, had wonderfully complex eyes and they were likely to be incredible visual predators of their time. In this interview we also … Continue reading Ep 77. Craft beers, trilobites and Lagerstätten with John Paterson

How much water does it take to grow a duck?

Wetlands, despite their name, aren’t always wet. But when the rain starts and the rivers flow theses dynamic landscapes can flourish with life. Though the question remains, how much water is enough? Freshwater ecosystems have been significantly altered by water management for human use. In particular, flow regulation has resulted in enormous declines in both the extent and health of wetlands. In 2018 Lindsey Frost … Continue reading How much water does it take to grow a duck?

The Science Behind Poultry Farming

The global demand for poultry continues to rise but the resources we have to produce them don’t, so how can we continue to farm poultry sustainably, ethically and responsibly? A large proportion (20%) of dietary protein fed to broiler chickens is undigestible. These represent a significant proportion of diet cost and may have negative effects on broiler gastrointestinal health and performance. Moreover, decreasing protein excretion … Continue reading The Science Behind Poultry Farming

Life on the Edge – The rocky shores of Australia

  Living on the edge is tough, and there’s nowhere tougher than the tidal shores of the rocky coastline. Despite pounding waves and the scorching sun live thrives. And it all comes down to the amount of water, the essential ingredient for life. Filmed by Siobhan Dennison Written and presented by James O’Hanlon Help In Situ Science create more great videos by becoming a patron … Continue reading Life on the Edge – The rocky shores of Australia