NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Scientists have developed a new type of enzyme, called a NanoZyme, which is triggered by light to produce free radicals that kill bacteria. The technology could be used one day to fight infections by sterilising high-risk surfaces in areas such as hospitals and public bathrooms. Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne created these NanoZymes from tiny nanorods of cupric oxide. The rods themselves are 1,000 … Continue reading NanoZymes: Making light work of bacteria

Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Dr Karl Kruszelnicki is perhaps Australia’s most prolific and well known science communicator. He has written over 43 books, and has appeared regularly on national radio for over 30 years. In an interview with In Situ Science we chat about the immense amount of research and hard work that goes in to building up Dr Karl’s broad  range of expertise. We then delve into his … Continue reading Ep 47. Sexy siestas and shooting for the stars with Dr Karl

Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

‘There are many Maries out there… But there’s only one Mariella, and thats me.’ – Mariella Herberstein In addition to her research, Mariella Herberstein is well known for her role as a mentor to emerging scientists in biological sciences. In an interview with In Situ Science she discusses how important a collegiate and positive research environment is to making good science happen. She also tells … Continue reading Ep 46. Eurovision, cake and ant-mimicking spiders with Mariella Herberstein

Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

To raise awareness for shorebird conservation, zoologist and illustrator Milly Formby has formed an epic plan; she will circumnavigate Australia in a microlight aircraft. This journey is roughly the same length as one of the worlds most important seabird migration routes, the East Asian-Australian Flyway. Milly is a multi-talented scientist, artist, and explorer. After beginner her career in visual arts as a tapestry weaver, she … Continue reading Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

“Born too late to explore the earth. Born too early to explore the stars” – Anonymous Modern scientists often have the strange feeling that they have been born in the wrong era; that they are the ‘middle children’ of history. They read enviously about the exploits of explorers past, sailing boldly into uncharted waters, and worry that they may never be able to undertake those … Continue reading Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

Ep 43. Microbial Game of Thrones with Gal Winter

How is your gut health affecting your brain? Recent research suggests that conditions like depression can actually be linked to the microbiology of your gut. Dr Gal Winter from the University of New England is a microbiologist that studies the microbial communities involved in food digestion and how it can affect your health. In an interview with In Situ Science Gal explains how your gut … Continue reading Ep 43. Microbial Game of Thrones with Gal Winter

Science Meets Making

Science is a creative process. Every time you ask a question or run an experiment you are doing something that has never been done before. Its no surprise then that science attracts very creative people. James O’Hanlon, the host of the In Situ Science podcast, is a zoologist that studies animal communication. To do this he uses his creative talents to make artificial animals that he … Continue reading Science Meets Making