Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Amy Martin is a researcher at the University of Auckland that studies the incredible private lives of orchids that trick male wasps into mating with them. By depriving these wasp populations of male sperm they can actually have long term effects on the wasp populations. Amy says that this is why deceptive orchids the world over tend to use haplodiploid insects as their pollinators as … Continue reading Ep 80. Deception, maths and parental expectations with Amy Martin

Ep 79. Meteorites, volcanoes and Armageddon with Tim Chapman

This episode sees our first ever geologist on the podcast. Tim Chapman is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of New England. He studies the high energy geological reactions, such as the formation of volcanoes and meteorite impacts, and what influence these have had on our landscape. https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/tudehb/TimChapman.mp3 As we discuss the cutting edge of geological science, Tim answers such pressing questions as ‘what … Continue reading Ep 79. Meteorites, volcanoes and Armageddon with Tim Chapman

Ep 77. Craft beers, trilobites and Lagerstätten with John Paterson

John Paterson is a professor of paleontology and earth sciences at the University of New England. He studies the evolution of life during the Cambrian explosion. Some of his recent research has shown that during this time some of the largest predators around, Anomalocaris, had wonderfully complex eyes and they were likely to be incredible visual predators of their time. In this interview we also … Continue reading Ep 77. Craft beers, trilobites and Lagerstätten with John Paterson

How much water does it take to grow a duck?

Wetlands, despite their name, aren’t always wet. But when the rain starts and the rivers flow theses dynamic landscapes can flourish with life. Though the question remains, how much water is enough? Freshwater ecosystems have been significantly altered by water management for human use. In particular, flow regulation has resulted in enormous declines in both the extent and health of wetlands. In 2018 Lindsey Frost … Continue reading How much water does it take to grow a duck?

The Science Behind Poultry Farming

The global demand for poultry continues to rise but the resources we have to produce them don’t, so how can we continue to farm poultry sustainably, ethically and responsibly? A large proportion (20%) of dietary protein fed to broiler chickens is undigestible. These represent a significant proportion of diet cost and may have negative effects on broiler gastrointestinal health and performance. Moreover, decreasing protein excretion … Continue reading The Science Behind Poultry Farming

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Become an In Situ Science Patron

In Situ Science is on a mission to support groundbreaking scientific research and exploration, and share this science with as many people as possible. In 2018 alone In Situ Science gave financial support to three different research projects, contributed to the SCINEMA international science film festival and the Sydney Science Festival, produced 26 freely available podcasts and supported a range of free science events throughout … Continue reading Become an In Situ Science Patron

Ep 75. Small shelly fossils and paleo tattoos with Marissa Betts

Palaeontology isn’t just about Dinosaurs! Marissa Betts is a researcher at the University of New England that studies the evolution of miniscule animals that existed during the Cambrian explosion. During this era animals evolved hard shelled bodies that made them much more likely to fossilise. By looking at these tiny fossils Marissa can investigate how lifeforms on earth have changed over millions of years and … Continue reading Ep 75. Small shelly fossils and paleo tattoos with Marissa Betts