Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Amphibian populations across the globe have been declining rapidly, and the most dangerous contributor to this is the chytrid fungus; a skin disease that affects frogs and salamanders. Dr Deborah Bower from the University of New England says that if we want to have any chance of saving these species then we need to conserve as much of their native habitat as possible. In an … Continue reading Ep 51. Leaky pipelines and chytrid fungus with Deborah Bower

Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

The tables have turned this episode as the interviewer becomes the interviewee. Siobhan Dennison puts In Situ Science host James O’Hanlon under the microscope to find out more about what he does and why he does it. James O’Hanlon is a behavioural ecologist from the University of New England that has a passion for studying poorly understood creatures and exploring the unknown. In this interview … Continue reading Ep 50. Creativity, flexibility and exploration with James O’Hanlon

Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

New research has revealed that the mating behaviour of the St Andrew’s cross spider changes with age, with older males investing more time in courtship, possibly to avoid cannibalisation by more aggressive females. The St Andrew’s cross spider is a colourful orb weaving spider that is best recognised by its banded abdomen and the characteristic X-shaped cross on its web. These spiders typically live for … Continue reading Older male spiders shudder longer in face of cannibal females

Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

To raise awareness for shorebird conservation, zoologist and illustrator Milly Formby has formed an epic plan; she will circumnavigate Australia in a microlight aircraft. This journey is roughly the same length as one of the worlds most important seabird migration routes, the East Asian-Australian Flyway. Milly is a multi-talented scientist, artist, and explorer. After beginner her career in visual arts as a tapestry weaver, she … Continue reading Ep 45. Wing Threads: Flight to the Tundra with Milly Formby

Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

“Born too late to explore the earth. Born too early to explore the stars” – Anonymous Modern scientists often have the strange feeling that they have been born in the wrong era; that they are the ‘middle children’ of history. They read enviously about the exploits of explorers past, sailing boldly into uncharted waters, and worry that they may never be able to undertake those … Continue reading Ep 44. Assassin bugs, cloud forests and spread-eagle hunters with Matthew Bulbert

Science Meets Making

Science is a creative process. Every time you ask a question or run an experiment you are doing something that has never been done before. Its no surprise then that science attracts very creative people. James O’Hanlon, the host of the In Situ Science podcast, is a zoologist that studies animal communication. To do this he uses his creative talents to make artificial animals that he … Continue reading Science Meets Making

Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders

Twice a year Australians get together to scour their backyards for native pollinators. The Wild Pollinator count is a nation-wide citizen science project aimed at increasing awareness of Australia’s native pollinator diversity. It was started a few years back by a team including ecologist Manu Saunders. In an interview with In Situ Science Manu describes how it is important that people understand that bees are … Continue reading Ep 41. Pollinators, Bond films and ecosystem services with Manu Saunders