Flashback podcast episodes are coming!

For the next few weeks the In Situ Science podcast will be taking a break while James tackles his next big life challenge – raising a newborn child! Over the break we will be revisiting some classic episodes from the back catalogue. https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/xsscvz/Dr_Karl.mp3 First off the rank is Episode 47 with the one and only Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. Dr Karl is perhaps Australia’s most prolific and … Continue reading Flashback podcast episodes are coming!

Ep 94. Painkillers, opioids and addiction with Adam Hamlin

Dr Adam Hamlin is a neuroscientist at the University of New England who studies how drugs, such as painkillers, affect brain neurochemistry. These chemicals can have wonderful affects and are miracles of modern medicine, however if used improperly can lead to dependencies and addictions. In this interview with Dr Hamlin we talk about how these painkillers work and what make them such effective and potentially … Continue reading Ep 94. Painkillers, opioids and addiction with Adam Hamlin

Ep 93. Cannabis, legalisation and pill testing with Samuel Banister

The cannabis plant is useful for everything from textiles to medicine, however our ability to use these plants has been hampered by its association with illegal drugs. People are beginning to make very big claims about the use of cannabinoids to treat almost every ailment under the sun, however the evidence still just isn’t there. Samuel Banister is a medicinal chemist at the Lambert Initiative … Continue reading Ep 93. Cannabis, legalisation and pill testing with Samuel Banister

Ep 92. Bird brains, documentaries and serial killers with Lucy Farrow

Humans have the biggest brains of any animals… well, kind of… only if we correct for body size… which is important… we think. Understanding animal intelligence is difficult, especially when brains are so complex that our own brains might be incapable of understanding themselves. When it comes to animals, brain size has been a primary indicator of intelligence, however showing that having bigger brains leads … Continue reading Ep 92. Bird brains, documentaries and serial killers with Lucy Farrow

Ep 91. Forensics, photography and the CSI effect with Glenn Porter

The science of forensics has been popularised by the success of TV crime shows, but the reality of how criminal investigations occur, and the science behind evidence gathering is often nowhere near as glamorous as these shows imply. While we may not be able to work the magic they show on TV, new technologies are aiding forensic scientists in more effectively gathering and presenting evidence. … Continue reading Ep 91. Forensics, photography and the CSI effect with Glenn Porter

Ep 90. Beards, phobias and implicit biases with Belinda Craig

How well can we read other people’s faces? And how good are we at faking our own emotional responses? Turns out not to great. In the absence of other contextual cues people are not very good at reading peoples facial expressions. Add to that the fact that cultural differences can have a huge impact on what emotions are expressed and how. As humans we are … Continue reading Ep 90. Beards, phobias and implicit biases with Belinda Craig

Ep 89. Tiny gardeners and environmental educators with Matthew McKenzie

Matthew McKenzie is the principal and head teacher of a public school with a difference. Thalgarrah Environmental Education Centre is located in the woodlands outside of Armidale in regional NSW. It is part of a network of environmental and zoo education centres across NSW that provide other schools with a base for excursions, camps and experiences focussed on using nature as a learning and teaching … Continue reading Ep 89. Tiny gardeners and environmental educators with Matthew McKenzie